Date of Award

1-23-2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

School Name

Annsley Frazier Thornton School of Education

Department

Education

Major Advisor

Dr. Donald Mitchell, Jr.

Second Advisor

Dr. Patricia Carver

Third Advisor

Dr. Michael Vetter

Abstract

This qualitative study used constructivist grounded theory to create an identity development theory for Black males who attended an historically Black college or university (HBCU). Cross’s (1991) Black identity development theory was used as the theoretical framework for this study. Guiding this study were two research questions which were: 1) how do the experiences at a historically Black college and university influence the identity development for Black males; and, 2) what external factors influence the identity development for Black males who attended a historically Black college and university? Eight Black males participated in this study. Criterion sampling was used to qualify participants as participants had to meet the following criterion: (a) self-identify as Black or African American; (b) self-identify as male; (c) completed all their undergraduate coursework and graduated from an HBCU. Data were gathered through two rounds of semi-structured interviews in which participants shared their story of their experiences at HBCUs. From the data, a four-phase identity development theory for Black males who attended HBCUs emerged. The four phases of Black male identity development at an HBCU are: 1) acknowledgment of being a Black male; 2) understanding that not all Black males are the same; 3) creation of an authentic professional identity; and 4) transition into a Black male role model. How this study advances the literature involving Black males and recommendations for future research are provided within the discussion.

Available for download on Monday, February 15, 2021

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